Lark Hotels are located in iconic New England villages and cities, and there is a great reason for that. Our desirable New England destinations always boast something new and rave-worthy. Here’s what 2013 brought (and what 2014 promises to bring) to our towns:

Kennebunkport: Last year brought David’s KPT to town from acclaimed Portland, Maine chef David Turin. Needless to say, it became instantly popular. The White Barn Inn unveiled a less-expensive winter bistro menu. The Kennebunkport Festival added an extra day and more events, and promises even more in 2014.

Nantucket: Island-goers formed long lines at the Hub’s new smoothie bar this summer and Proprietors, the latest venture from chef/restaurateur Michael Lascola (of American Seasons) was an unqualified hit. The scuttlebutt on 2014 is a new BBQ joint from chef Fred Bisaillon, formerly of Brant Point Grill. We’re keeping our ear to the ground.

Newport: The juicy beauties at the new Mission Burger got everybody all aflutter in 2013, as did everything on the menu at Stoneacre Pantry. We’re hearing that a fourth day will be added to the fabulous Folk Festival in 2014, so stay tuned for more details.

Portland: New England’s foodiest city got a hip dim sum eatery (Empire Chinese Kitchen), one of the country’s most buzzed-about new bars (Portland Hunt & Alpine Club), a bunch of stellar food trucks (including the clever cookery of Small Axe, and – just under the wire with a December 30 opening – an ultra-locavore bistro (Vinland). And that’s just the short list. 2014 promises even more culinary excitement with the much-anticipated openings of Central Provisions, Miyake Diner and Slab.

Portsmouth: New Hampshire’s seacoast city saw the re-opening of the pedestrian-friendly Memorial Bridge to Kittery in 2013 after two years of renovations, and the new nano-brewery, Earth Eagle, introduced gruit around town. Check it out at the brewery’s tasting room at 175 High Street next time you visit. This year may result in a new ice rink at Strawbery Banke Museum (if it skates through the web of local controversy).