Leisure

Martha's Vineyard Museums in Edgartown

We love life on Martha's Vineyard and are all in when it comes to learning about the history of the island. These three great Martha's Vineyard museums in Edgartown can help you take a peek into the Vineyard of old with a tour of a historic home, some antique firefighting equipment, and the historical society's collection. Perfect for rainy or cool days, next time you're on a lark to one of our Edgartown boutique hotels, visit one of our favorite Martha's Vineyard museums.

Martha's Vineyard Museum | 59 School Street, Edgartown | (508) 627-4441

This museum houses artifacts collected by the Martha's Vineyard Historical Society that cover the history of the island from Colonial times to today. Watch as the island was transformed from a whaling community to a posh summer retreat through the exhibits. In the summer months, tour the historic Thomas Cooke House, built in 1740, view the Fresnel lens used in the island's lighthouses, and see a demonstration of a tryworks, used in the process of turning whale blubber into oil. This interactive museum campus will entertain visitors of all ages.

Vincent House Museum | 99 Main St, Edgartown | 508-627-4440

The historic home, so named for the Vincent family that lived in it until 1940, has the distinction of being the oldest residence on the island. Now maintained by the Martha's Vineyard Preservation Trust, the museum represents several periods within the island's history, with each room in the house dedicated to a different century. Admission includes a guided tour of the house and a visit to the Whaling Church next door.

Edgartown Fire Museum | 68 Peases Point Way S, Edgartown

First established 180 years ago, the Edgartown fire department has a great collection of antique equipment at its museum. This newly constructed museum, located behind the fire station, is a home for its collection of antique equipment and serves to educate visitors not only about the history of the department but about fire safety as well. From antique trucks to a 23-foot tub on wheels that acted as a water source for fighting fires, you'll marvel at the sheer determination of firefighters of yesteryear.