Leisure

Visit These Lighthouses on Block Island

As a small island in Rhode Island Sound, you can expect Block Island to have a few good lighthouses. You'll find two of these historic navigational aids on Block Island—the Block Island North Light and the Block Island Southeast Light. The grounds of both are open to visitors, with a gift shop and museum too. Take a tour of the Southeast Light to climb the tower and learn about island history and the shipwrecks that surround the island. Next time you're on a lark to our boutique Block Island hotel, visit these lighthouses on Block Island to take in the beautiful beachy scenery.

Block Island North Light | Sandy Point, New Shoreham

This lighthouse on the northern end of Block Island was built in 1868 and is the fourth lighthouse on this spot. Built from granite and iron, the North Light looks like a municipal building with a light tower, rising up out of the sand dunes and beach grass—pretty unique! The lighthouse was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974 and restored in the early 90s. Today, a museum occupies the first floor of the lighthouse, but no tower tours are offered. Visit the museum to learn about the history of the lighthouse and its restoration, as well as to admire the architecture. To reach the lighthouse, you can ride a bike, drive, or take a taxi out to the parking area, about 10-minute drive from our boutique Block Island hotel. From the parking lot, it's an additional 20-minute walk over sand to the lighthouse. But it's worth the trip; Sandy Point is a beautiful place to appreciate the serenity and solitude of Block Island.

Block Island Southeast Light | Spring St, New Shoreham

Head south from New Shoreham to find the other lighthouse on Block Island. Located on the Mohegan Bluffs on Block Island's southern end, the lighthouse overlooks the ocean from these dramatic cliffs. Built in 1874, the tower and adjacent keeper's house were built in a Gothic style using red brick. This style makes it one of the more unique lighthouses in the country, as most were designed with function in mind, rather than aesthetics. The light still uses the original Fresnel lens, and tours of the tower are offered in the summer. Don't miss this chance to climb feet and get a bird's eye view of Block Island and the surrounding waters.